giving: a floral twine string dispenser.

November 16, 2021

Rose conceived of this basket made from paper-wrapped wire for being the perfect spot to stash yarn and string and keep it tidy during projects, but its usefulness and loveliness doesn’t end there. In today’s guide, a few of our favorite ideas for making a floral twine string dispenser and offering it as a gift during the holidays, or anytime…

A little kit for making:

If you’re not up to the task of making the basket and offering it yourself, or you know someone who would love the chance to try it for themselves, offer the supplies in a cloth bulk bag and you’ve got yourself a neat little kit. All you need is the floral twine, a bundle of clothespins, and the inside of an embroidery hoop. Add a link or search instructions for our floral twine string dispenser tutorial, and you’ll have given everything your loved one needs to practice a new craft and end up with a basket of their own making.

A little calm:

I’m forever a fan of gifting things that can get used and used up! Fill up the basket with a handful of your favorite little soaps and bath fizzies like these lovely ones from Even Keel. The basket can hang from a hook in the bathroom (floral twine makes good friends with damp places) and provide a winter’s worth of indulgences. (Use the code NEWFRIEND20 to receive free shipping!)

A little life:

Inspect your favorite houseplant for pups or offshoots that you can trim and offer to a friend. This is an offshoot from a pilea mother, also known as the sharing plant, so it’s the perfect offering for friends or family in need of a little greenery. Most plants will propagate easily with a bit of tender care, but look into the specifics for cutting and propagating whatever you want to share before snipping away at your plant! We placed our little botanical offering in a vintage propagation vase and simply reshaped the floral wire to form around it—no other special adjustments to the tutorial needed!

A little nourishment:

Another gift that gets used up: a few heads of locally grown garlic in what makes the perfect garlic basket for hanging in the kitchen. If you need something more special, add a subscription to a local farm share or groceries bundle.

A little project:

Rose first conceived of this basket as the perfect place to stash a ball of string or yarn, so offering it to serve that function only stands to reason. Tuck in a beautiful ball of peruvian wool yarn and a pair of knitting needles. If you’d like to up the ante, offer the gift of a workshop or class at a local yarn store like Wild Hand or Textile Arts Center or send it along with this beginners bundle from Brooklyn General Store.

Also, remember that a ball of basic kitchen twine plus chopsticks is all you need to make a beautiful potholder.

A little light:

The floral wire can be easily molded into shape and used to present just about any favorite house warming gift in a beautiful bundle. Here, we wrapped up tiny beeswax tapers for the menorah—forty-four, plus a few extras, to get through all eight nights of Hanukkah.

***

For the past few years, Rose Pearlman and I have been collaborating on simple, useful craft projects made from humble materials that can serve a practical purpose in your home. In celebration of our past work, we’ve designed a series of holiday gift guides that showcase just some of the ways that these humble crafts can become a part of a special holiday gift—or simply be the gift itself.

This post includes affiliate links to online shops. Reading My Tea Leaves might earn a small commission on the goods purchased through those links, but most of these supplies can be found locally right in your own community. If you’d like to support this site directly, you can contribute directly here. Thanks so much for supporting this work.

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2 Comments

  • Reply Megan November 16, 2021 at 2:48 pm

    Maybe a floral twine basket with a jar of fire cider 🙂

    • Reply ERIN BOYLE November 16, 2021 at 3:06 pm

      The possibilities are endless!

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