my week in objects (mostly).

May 17, 2019

1. these peonies.

peonies

{for still sitting pretty.}

2. this little support stick.

sunflower start

{for three sets of leaves and counting.}

3. these wedding duds.

wedding clothes

{for the very cutest flower kids to be.}

4. these alphabet letters.

magnets

{and remembering we had them.}

5. this cotton ribbon.

ribbon

{for a little weekend party prep.}

a clear, bright, detailed vision of what’s at stake, and what’s ahead.

the historical record is clear.

(also.)

the author is a woman.

these policies aren’t contradictory at all.

words matter.

a salad the size of my head (no, bigger).

it’s soothing and enriching and fun.

rest.

replenishment.

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13 Comments

  • Reply Jen May 17, 2019 at 4:34 pm

    Just wanted to say thanks for always having great, thought-provoking articles in your list of links!

    1
  • Reply Robin May 17, 2019 at 5:04 pm

    Hi Erin,
    I always enjoy your Friday posts so much, both the 5 things, and the links. Happy wedding and party prep!
    Re: this week’s links – the 6th line (“words matter”) doesn’t show as a link, and I’m thinking you meant for it to be one (?)

    1
    • Reply ERIN BOYLE May 23, 2019 at 9:21 am

      Ah, darn it. I can’t remember what I meant to put there!

  • Reply Doe May 17, 2019 at 6:10 pm

    Here is a sentence: “When the state forces a woman to give birth, it is extracting pain as a physical penalty—a price no cisgender man who has sex for nonprocreative purposes will ever have to pay. ” Wow. And that is the least of it.

    1
    • Reply Betty May 22, 2019 at 5:31 pm

      Wow…the misandry in your reply is coming through loud and clear! When are you going to stop being angry that mother nature, the universe or whatever designer you subscribe to decided that women would give birth and that it would involve some pain? Who the hell said it was a physical penalty to women? Giving birth is painful because homo sapiens give birth to fairly developed young, and our big skulls protect the big brains we grew to evolve. You sound so hateful. Oh no, let me you don’t hate or resent men or children. Please go ahead and take birth control or get your tubes tied or whatever…no one said you have to have a child. And getting pregnant, carrying a child and then the pain of childbirth isn’t a penalty or a punishment that these “horrible” men somehow got away with. Please…do the future of humanity a favour and don’t contribute.

      • Reply ERIN BOYLE May 23, 2019 at 9:19 am

        Doe is my mom. She’s a 62-year-old post-menopausal mother and grandmother. She’s well acquainted with the size of human skulls as she’s birthed four of them, including twins, from her own vagina without the aid of pain medication. Her comment was a quote from an essay linked to above which explores the idea that the current administration wields pain as punishment and suggests that the act of forcing a woman to bear children *against her will* is a form of physical punishment. You don’t have to agree, of course, but it’s an interesting intellectual position and it’s not hateful in the slightest.

  • Reply Julia Bemis May 17, 2019 at 6:14 pm

    Now I know where to buy the next baby Is your sister getting married. I remember you shared her writing.

  • Reply steph May 17, 2019 at 7:30 pm

    as always, such a great link round up! intrigued by ‘how to do something’ … i just wrote a love letter to my favorite things – they’re free and all I have to do is prioritize them daily, religiously, as much as possible: https://tps-steph.blogspot.com/2019/05/0037-25-ways-to-treat-yo-self.html

    1
  • Reply McKenzie Allyshia May 17, 2019 at 11:57 pm

    Somehow I always manage to forget just how much I love peonies.

    1
  • Reply Amy Sjoquist May 18, 2019 at 10:55 am

    Politico’s The Real Origins of the Religious Right, while helpful in realizing that there is a more rooted historical understanding needed with regard to the religious right, is overly simplistic in understanding the formation of the political movement. It involves a much more complicated history that traces its origins far deeper into America’s past. Fundamentalism and American Culture by George Marsden gives a far more in depth and better researched account of the roots of the religious right, highlighting how often a movement bent toward the good (i.e. the Women’s Christian Temperance Union) gets swept up in politics and too much zeal, resulting in something very harmful. I’m glad that you posted the link, Erin; there is so much about the history of fundamentalism that is so often ignored or untaught. But it is, I think, important, and quite humbling, to make sure thorough research is done so that we don’t repeat history…

    • Reply ERIN BOYLE May 19, 2019 at 3:42 pm

      Sure, of course! This is a compelling piece of the story and valuable piece of journalism, not a full-length academic text!

      • Reply Amy Sjoquist May 21, 2019 at 5:19 pm

        I should say, I also love the peonies :).

  • Reply Hannah May 19, 2019 at 11:10 am

    Such pretty peonies!!! Love this series.

    1
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